PDR27
THREE D BOATS!

Pics show one boat on the lawn this arvo, and the garage which is starting to look like a hatchery. It's amazing how the curved side decks (not shown) changes the boat visually; you'll just have to wait and see.

Well we got our two boats to a floating stage, but not operational...

We have no doubts that building one basic boat could be achieved in a weekend by a moderately skilled person, but two weekends would give a bit more relaxation time.

Our boats have a few complexities which we think will take another day's worth of work on each: Foils to be shaped and glassed, side decks and bouyancy tanks installed, centreboard case and thwart, as well as an adjustable mast step.
 

PDR28a
BACK INTO THE SHED

Our boats have a few complexities which we think will take another day's worth of work on each: Foils to be shaped and glassed, side decks and buoyancy tanks installed, centreboard case and thwart, as well as an adjustable mast step

The boats in their bare form were a little flexible... actually they reminded me of a contortionist I saw in China, but that's OK they aren't finished.

PDR29
TIME FOR A WEIGH IN

The bare hull as shown weighs barely 10kg, and with all the remaining parts in it, we weighed it at 22kg. We expect that when finished it'll come in below 35kg which is a nice weight for two kids to carry on their own.

PDR32
STIFF ENOUGH FOR YOU?

Michael screwed the deck panels on temporarily, using a couple of gyprock screws in each corner, probably 6" apart, and the hulls are now so stiff they can be picked up by one corner and there is NO movement at all.

PDR31
AND SO QUIET TOO

Before stiffening the structure, every time Michael moved the boats (in my absence ) he was frightened by/of the cracking sounds as the flexing put load on the epoxy joints, now they are quiet as little mice.

PDR30a
EXTRA REINFORCEMENT

One thing he did was put a permanent (stainless steel) screw in the inside of the boat at both ends, holding the ends of the sheer clamp (the bit stuck on the top outside of the hull) to prevent a tearing failure at that point when the tops of the bulkheads were being bevelled.

This may not be necessary with better quality ply, but it's better to be safe than sorry.

PDR33
EPOXY COATING

Pouring on the epoxy and using a ply offcut as a squeegee prior to rolling. The molasses coloured epoxy is at least 9 years old, and I've been waiting for a job for it. Epoxy and hardener will keep almost indefinitely if stored in a sealed container away from light, and we had no problems at all with it. The yucky colour was the way it was delivered all those years ago.

Note the patches where we have filled all the temporary screw holes and exposed seams with lightweight filler before sealing the outside.

PDR38
WAITING FOR FILLER

Two hulls in a cool boatshed sort of shot, all glassed with two coats of poxy waiting for the filler.

PDR43
SIDE TANKS DESIGNED ON THE RUN

Today Michael did a lot of juggling of ply. He's had a cutting plan developed since day one, but the moment of truth has arrived. We won't have a square foot left out of our three sheets, and he's juggled the size of the aft compartments to suit.

The bulkhead for the compartment (the triangular bit in the middle of the side deck) is made of two pieces, such is our determination!

You'll see in an evolution of an idea used very successfully in the Mk2 version which is the version in the current plan set we have used the offcuts from the hull panel as a nice curved deck. (It's OK, it won't be bent when it's finished, there's no framing there yet.)

PDR44
TANK TEMPLATE

The template for the side panel is being juggled so we don't have to buy any more ply. If you look carefully you'll see that by flipping it over we'll get the other panel. What remains will be almost the total waste for the ply.

We were aiming to angle the side panel at 18 but just didn't have enough ply so 10 it is. This will hopeful give us a bit of a boaty feel and won't be too hard to build, now that the hard bit's done, and Michael can publish an accurate setout drawing. By reducing the height of the sides slightly this has been achieved in the current plans.

PDR52
CENTREBOARD CASES

Michael in the meantime had been beavering away in the corner of the garage, working on the centreboard cases (note the insides are fully epoxy coated prior to assembly)

PDR53
SIDE DECKS AND COAMINGS

Oh, and he'd also completed gluing the coamings to the side decks, and making the front bulkheads for the side tanks.

Note the coaming will act as a structural beam to hold all this stuff up, although we'll probably stick a couple of 'glass pads under where we'll sit just to be safe. (Glass wouldn't be necessary with 6mm ply).

PDR55
SIDE TANK FRONT PANELS

Side buoyancy tank front panels now glued in place (held by temporary screws through the hull), deck coaming in place and nice curvy deck showing it's stuff.

Note the angle of the bulkhead and the cleat on the transom, both of which will support the tank face at the same angle to the hull bottom. This should give quite a "boaty" feel when it's all done.

The deck curve is the offcut from the hull side panel cutout, an idea borrowed from Ken Abrahams who built boat #2, although we have changed the buoyancy tanks somewhat!

PDR56
SIDE TANK FITTING

Side tank side clipped into place, but about an inch higher than it needs to be (it's the overlapping bit at the top of the deck held by the spring clamp) so that scribing the bottom can take place.

PDR57
SCRIBING THE SIDE TANK

Scribing the line of the bottom is easy with a small block of wood holding the pencil off the floor.

PDR58
STITCHING THE SIDE TANKS

A plastic bag full of epoxy is used to "stitch" the bottom panels in. Once the epoxy has gone off, we'll take out the temporary fixings and do a proper structural fillet.

Note the gap towards the rear of this one where we simply ran out of ply! It will be covered by a fillet in an hour or two and no-one will ever know!

PDR59
CENTREBOARD STRUCTURE

Centreboard cases now with beams attached top and bottom. Note only one needed per boat!

PDR60
HULL STRUCTURE EVOLVES

The two beams on the floor in the first shot haven't yet been fixed in while we nut out their final location, but they will fit either end of the centreboard case. We'll then glue a couple of stringers (skids) lengthwise under the hull, so the structure becomes a grid with plywood holding it together. Every bit of structure then ties together to form a light, but quite rigid shell.

Note that when we replaced the bottom with "proper" 6mm marine ply the floor had enough rigidity to do away with the skids.

PDR61
A BOAT MUM, WE'VE GOT A BOAT!

Note the Eureka Canoe in the background of one of the shots has rolled over to expose it's belly. Must be expecting some sort of a tickle later in the night... the sort that happens with 120 grit on a ROS.

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hull assembly 2
hull completion
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